background image

Conclusions 

1.

  Defkalion was able to demonstrate an excess of energy. 

2.

  They were able to demonstrate that they canfully control the reaction: starting 

it, stopping it, increasing and decreasing it.   

3.

  They were able to demonstrate that the reaction is dependent on hydrogen gas. 

4.

  The contents of the reactor were removed and weighed to be 59 grams of mass, 

most of which was a ceramic encasement.  Therefore, the reaction appears to 
produce more energy than a chemical reaction from a known amount with an 
equivalent mass; implying a nuclear reaction is involved.    

5.

  There were error bands associated with all data obtained which have not yet 

been completely established.  These will need to be addressed in a detailed 
analysis of this data. 

6.

  It is my opinion that Defkalion is sincerely attempting to accurately measure 

and demonstrate the performance of their technology with confidence that 
they can achieve a COP >1 for a long enough period to exclude any possibility 
of a chemical reaction.   

Recommendations 

1.

  Defkalion needs to test their apparatus in a configuration that provides an 

optimal COP without concern that steam is generated.  The internal reactor 
performs best when it can be triggered above a temperature of 310 degrees C.  
Testers need to be advised to bring the appropriate apparatus to handle proper 
measurement of the energy from steam if necessary.  A thermal fluid with a 
boiling point above 250 degree C may also be used if the piping and reservoir 
material in the lab can accommodate this temperature safely.  Also, the system 
may be sealed to allow a build-up of pressure to raise the boiling point of the 
thermal fluid.   

2.

  Defkalion needs to maintain a flow rate through the reactor high enough to be 

above the lower limit of measure of the flow meter used.  Since the flow meter 
was reading at its lower limit I manually calibrated the flow meter to compare 
accumulated flow as measured by LabView with what I measured with a stop 
watch and a scale.  For a total mass flow of 758 ml over five minutes two 
different times, my manual approach with a stop watch and a scale was 
different from LabVIEW by only 61 ml the first time and 58 ml the second time.