background image

Executive Summary of Defkalion Technology Review 

By Michael A. Nelson 

Observations 

1.

 

I found everyone at Defkalion including John Hadjichristos and his lab assistants very 
cooperative with all aspects of the testing.  Everything that I asked them to do was done 
without hesitation.  I was allowed to bring in an independent set of thermocouples and data 
logging system to capture my own readings of the temperatures of the input and output fluid 
circuits through the Defkalion as an independent verification of their laboratory temperature 
measurements.  My measurements varied from Defkalion’s temperature measurements by only 
tenths of a degree.   

2.

 

The first day of testing, they were able to show me that the computed output of the system 
versus the input power used to drive the system was between 1.4 and 1.5 as calculated by their 
LabVIEW software.  This was based on assumptions that they were making about the heat of 
vaporization of the 30% glycol mixture that they were using.  Post test, there was a question 
about the actual thermal characteristics of the fluid they were using.  So, I brought a one liter 
sample back to the US with me to have characterized by a materials expert volunteering to 
help.   There were also some questions about the accuracy of the flow rates.  Finally, in case 
there were any questions about the calculations being used anywhere in the 

LabVIEW

 software, 

I had them provide me a copy of the 

LabVIEW

 project files they were using for this test.    

3.

 

On the second day of testing I had them charge the reactor with Argon to show the dependence 
of the reaction on hydrogen gas.  As predicted by Defkalion, the argon (blank) run produced 
significantly less output than when charged with hydrogen.   The COP was <1.  Also a quick 
test was done to see if the instrumentation system was properly reading the input power and 
calculating the output power by using a set of resistive heating elements mounted on the wall 
of the laboratory for this purpose.  This demonstrated that the instrumentation system was 
performing as expected and the data obtained on this run matched data obtained from the same 
test having been performed previously.     

4.

 

Before leaving for this trip, it was stressed to me that I should observe this system without 

allowing the system to produce steam.  After the third and final day that I was there, it became 

very clear to me that this test apparatus was not designed to operate in a single phase with the 

thermal fluid mix being used.  They used a mixture of 30% EG (Glycol) and 70% water for my 
first two days of testing.  I had them use 100% water in the last day of testing.  In spite of the 

inability to maintain a single phase, I believe the measurements of the flow meter was located 
far enough away from the reactor to be unaffected by the back pressure of the thermal fluid as 

it flashed upon entering the reactor.  The water feeding the reactor on the last day came 

directly from the water grid of Athens ensuring that a constant positive pressure was 

maintained through the flow meter all the way to the reactor.  There were no bubbles observed 

in the water flowing to the reactor.  For the third and final day of testing, Defkalion, chose to 

trigger the hydrogen reaction much more aggressively than was done on the first day.  Upon a 

preliminary look at the data, the reactor was operating well in excess of a COP of 3.